Business & Economic Development

The Business and Economic Development Committee monitors, solicits and maintains information on business opportunities and provides direction and programs for economic development for Chamber members.

Communications & Marketing

The Communication & Marketing Committee coordinates the public image of the JBCC. The Committee develops and implements communications to keep the Chamber’s members, strategic partners, stakeholders and other impact groups informed about Chamber program initiatives. The Committee assists with Chamber communications, marketing materials, media materials and website development.

Membership

The Membership Committee supports the ongoing recruitment and retention of JBCC members. Additionally, the Committee expands the membership base by recommending membership categories under-served by the Chamber. This Committee works to continuously improve the delivery of services to members.

Breaking Down Barriers

Entrepreneurial education. Once upon a time, rugged individualism, intrepid determination and subject matter expertise—in food service, publishing or hair-care products manufacturing—was enough to start and grow a significant business. Today, African-American business owners must be students and ultimately masters of entrepreneurship itself, including developing a capacity for raising capital, financial management, strategic planning, brand positioning, mergers and acquisitions and other nuts and bolts of growth beyond mom-and-pop status.

The need to achieve scale. It’s relatively easy to start a business, especially given the popularity of entrepreneurship as a viable and legitimate career objective among younger Americans, and young black Americans in particular. The challenge today for black-owned businesses is achieving the scale necessary to compete, whether for government contracts or to do business with large multinational corporations.

Greater access to financing. Despite the progress made by black entrepreneurs over the past 20 years in particular, very few have been able to gain access to the predominantly white private equity, angel investor and venture capital communities that have driven investment in the innovative new companies and industries currently fueling our economy, especially in the technology space. A growing number of programs and initiatives are working to better prepare black entrepreneurs to establish relationships within those communities, and to do a better job of attracting interest and competing for investment.

Next Steps…PROPERLY ESTABLISH YOUR ENTITY

OPERATING AS A SOLE PROPRIETOR WOULD MAKE IT VERY DIFFICULT TO ESTABLISH AND BUILD A QUALITY BUSINESS CREDIT PROFILE. SO THE FIRST THING THAT YOU WANT TO DO IS PLAN TO INCORPORATE YOUR BUSINESS AS EITHER A C-CORP, S-CORP, OR LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC).